In north Florida you can prune your roses during the months of December through February. Pruning develops plant energy, which will provide new growth and blooms. Rose pruning consists of removing twigs and branches that may be dead, or injured, along with some healthy top growth. Pruning the main canes, lateral branches, small twigs and some of the oldest canes improves the plant's form and regulates its height. This pruning will help in producing better light conditions within the plant, along with preventing diseases and fungi development. Leaving at lease half the length of each main cane that is one to three years old is recommended. The first set of flowers can be expected eight to nine weeks after pruning is completed, so be sure not to prune your roses any earlier than December. To avoid branch die back and encourage rapid healing, pruning cuts should be made 1/4" above a dormant bud. When removing an entire branch make a smooth cut at the point of juncture or ground level. Remember, pruning will promote new growth and blooms, so prune eight to nine weeks before you want the first blooms and enjoy the beautiful color of your rose garden. 

Pond Clean-Up

For your pond to look great all summer, chances are it needs a good spring-cleaning. Take a look... a layer of "crud" at the bottom and dark water means you need a thorough cleaning. If there's just a small amount of debris in the pond and the water quality looks good you might simply need to clean it with a net. Regardless, we provide full pond service... draining, gathering fish, pressure washing rock, cleaning filters and nets and adding chemicals back in to neutralize the PH. Let us know today how we can assist you in maintaining your pond. 

A green thumb is easier than it looks!

We can all have gorgeous flower beds bursting with blooms... all it takes are a few simple, yet vital steps when preparing your beds for spring planting. Apply the following tlc and your beds will say "thank you" all summer long! Cut away die back on perennials and remove dead foliage (great for compost.) Test the PH in the soil. If it's too acidic add line to amend (4 lb of lime per 100 sq. feet.) Add 3 lb of sulfur per 100 sq. feet to amend alkaline soil. Till the soil (for annuals... avoid tilling around perennials.) Add compost or manure to the soil. Happy planting Tallahassee!